About the Rancho Mirage, CA Area

I look forward to helping you with all of your real estate needs in Rancho Mirage, Palm Springs, Palm Desert, Indian Wells, La Quinta, Desert Hot Springs, Cathederal City, Indio, and the surrounding areas of the Coachella Valley.

Indio, CA

Indio, CA

Indio is a city in Riverside County, California, United States, located in the Coachella Valley of Southern California’s Colorado Desert region. It lies 26 miles (42 km) east of Palm Springs, 70 miles (113 km) east of Riverside, and 125 miles (201 km) east of Los Angeles. The population was 49,116 at the 2000 census. The word indio is Spanish for Indian. Indio was once referred to as “the Hub of the Valley”, the city Chamber of Commerce jingle in the 1970s.

History
The City of Indio came about because of the need of a halfway point for the Southern Pacific Railroad between Yuma and Los Angeles. The engines needed to be cleaned of all of the sand taken in and re-filled with water. At first, the-would-be city was called Indian Wells, but because of so many other areas already called that, Indio — after a Spanish variation of the word “Indian” — was chosen. After the railroad’s arrival in 1876, Indio really started to take root. The first permanent building was the craftsman style Southern Pacific Depot station and hotel. Southern Pacific tried to make life as comfortable as it could for their workers in order to keep them from leaving such a difficult at the time area to live in. It was at the same the center of all social life in the desert with a fancy dining room and hosting dances on Friday nights.

While Indio started as a railroad town, it developed into an agricultural area shortly after. Onions, cotton, grapes, citrus and dates thrived in the arid climate due to the ingenuity of farmers finding various means of attaining water; first through artesian wells and later through the valley’s branch of the All-American Canal. However, water also was a major problem for Indio and the city was flooded several times until the storm water canals were created throughout the Coachella Valley.

Businessmen and women found this last frontier land of the continental United States as an ideal place to start fresh. Dr. Harry Smiley and his wife Nell were early residents and stayed in Indio after their car broke down on the way to Los Angeles and became people of influence and helped shape the area. A.G. Tingman was an early storeowner and first Postmaster of Indio, but also well known for taking advantage of miners as they headed to the mountains, selling at rather high prices. Later Dr. June Robertson McCarroll became a leading philanthropist as well as successful doctor in Indio. She was responsible along with the Indio Woman’s Club for pressing California into adopting the placing of white lines down the streets after she nearly got hit one too many times by passing vehicles. But even though these early founders of the city are considered pioneers, they still partook in the lifestyles of their friends living in such areas as Los Angeles. Indio established itself quickly and kept up with all the trends as they were brought in by the railroads.

At the turn of the last century, Indio was already an area that was not going to be a fading railroad town. Schools were built, the La Casita hospital provided medical services, and families established roots. This was the growth of a city, not just a railroad town.

Indio also served as the home of the USDA’s Date Station, a place where leading scientific research was taking place on the fruit that would become a major part of the culture of Indio. The station started in 1907 and was responsible for the ability of local farmers to better understand this unique crop and make the Coachella Valley a leader in American date crops. This also created a special tie of Indio to the Middle East that continues today. This also led to the one of a kind them for our County Fair with the Middle Eastern flair.

It was not long before Coachella and Thermal were larger cities than Indio, but Indio remained the “Hub of the Valley,” as it was so called. With the burning of the majority of Thermal and the decline Coachella, Indio grew again. By 1930 Indio was a thriving area and incorporated. On September 6, 1930, storekeeper Fred Kohler received the first business license in Indio.
It was also aided by the visiting soldiers from Patton’s training grounds in Chiraco. However, Indio saw another decline as the valley’s population begin to move west towards newer city’s such as Palm Desert. However, now there is a reversal in this trend and the eastern section of the valley is poised to once again become the center of the Coachella Valley.

The city had unemployment rates (in some cases over 20 percent) in the late 20th century and from the Late-2000s recession[citation needed]. The rate in 2006 was under 5 percent after the local economy rebounded in the real estate boom when more affluent new residents moved in. The rapid population growth fueled the city’s present need for employment opportunities.

Palm Desert, Ca.

Palm Desert

Palm Desert is a city in Riverside County, California, United States, in the Coachella Valley, approximately 11 miles (18 km) east of Palm Springs. The population was 41,155 at the 2000 census. The city was one of the state’s fastest growing in the 1980s and 1990s,[citation needed] beginning with 11,801 residents in 1980, doubling to 23,650 in 1990, 35,000 in 1995, and nearly double its 1990 population by 2000.

A major center of growth in the Palm Springs area, Palm Desert is a popular retreat for “snowbirds” from colder climates (the Eastern and Northern US, and Canada), who swell its population by an estimated 31,000 each winter. In the past couple of years Palm Desert has seen more residents become “full-timers” (mainly from California, who have come for affordable but high-valued home prices).

History
The area was first known as the Old MacDonald Ranch, but the name changed to Palm Village in the 1920s when date palms were planted. Local historians said the main residents of pre-1950 Palm Desert were Cahuilla Indian farmers of the now extinct San Cayetano tribe, but a few members of the Montoya family of Cahuilla/Spanish descent were prominent leaders in civic life.
Palm Desert once served as a training ground for General George Patton’s Third Army troops and tank battalions. After World War II, Cliff Henderson, a Los Angeles developer, began to develop the desert into his dream community.

The first residential development occurred in 1943 in connection with an Army maintenance camp in the area. That site was later developed into “El Paseo”, an upscale shopping district not unlike Rodeo Drive. In 1948, the Palm Desert Corporation began to develop real estate, and in 1951 the area was given its present name.

Many celebrities keep homes in Palm Desert, including Rita Rudner and more recently, the current home of teenage pro golfer Michelle Wie and one of the homes of Bill Gates. Film producers Jerry Weintraub and Robert Velo call Palm Desert their second home. With only 1,500 permanent residents, the community was incorporated on November 26, 1973. At the time, Palm Desert was a master planned community situated in the desert that used to stretch from Palm Springs to Indio

Serving the Coachella Valley

Serving the Coachella Valley

Welcome to the Coachella Valley —

The eight desert resort cities have blossomed into a year-round haven for visitors and residents. With nearly 365 days of sunshine, an abundance of entertainment and activities, and the picturesque Santa Rosa and San Jacinto mountains, the Coachella Valley offers a sense of paradise to 3.5 million visitors every year.

The Coachella Valley is home to over 500 celebrities. Gene Autry, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Kathy Griffin, Kevin Costner, Dinah Shore, Clint Eastwood, and Bill Gates are just some celebrities that have made the valley their getaway and home for years. They cannot resist the peaceful, sun-soaked lifestyle and idyllic setting.

The desert offers ample and lavish fairways and greens, as well as horse riding, tennis, nightlife, fine art, and music. Whether looking for rest and relaxation (natural mineral waters and spa treatments deliver) or an invigorating outdoor adventure (off-roading and hiking fit the bill), you’ll find your own piece of paradise.

 

 

Palm Springs, CA

Palm Springs

Palm Springs is a desert city in Riverside County, California, within the Coachella Valley. It is located approximately 37 miles east of San Bernardino, 111 miles (177 km) east of Los Angeles and 136 miles (225 km) northeast of San Diego. As of the 2000 census, the city population was 42,807. Golf, swimming, tennis, horseback riding and hiking in the nearby desert and mountain areas are major forms of recreation in Palm Springs.[citation needed] The area codes for Palm Springs are 760 and 442. The ZIP codes for Palm Springs are 92262 through 92264.

Climate
Located in the Coachella Valley desert region, Palm Springs is sheltered by the San Bernardino Mountains to the north, the Santa Rosa Mountains to the south, by the San Jacinto Mountains to the west and by the Little San Bernardino Mountains to the east. This geography gives Palm Springs its hot, dry climate, with 354 days of sunshine and only 5.23 inches (132.8 mm) of rain annually.[3] The winter months are warm, with the coolest days averaging in the upper 60s to lower 70s °F (21-23 °C), and corresponding nights falling to the lower to mid 40s °F (6-8 °C).[3] Freezes are uncommon but possible, occurring on an average 3 nights.[4] The lowest temperature recorded is 19 °F (−7.2 °C), on January 22, 1937.[3] Summer often sees daytime temperatures at or above 105 °F (40.6 °C), with lows often not falling below 80 °F (26.7 °C). There are 180 days with a high reaching 90 °F (32.2 °C), and 100 °F (37.8 °C) can be seen on 116.[4] The highest temperature on record in Palm Springs is 123 °F (50.6 °C), recorded on several occasions.[3] A low of 105 °F (40.6 °C), was recorded on July 13, 1985, one of the highest nighttime lows in the western hemisphere.

Economy
Palm Springs Official Visitors Center is located in a historic gas station building designed by Albert Frey.

Though celebrities still retreat to Palm Springs, many today establish residences in other areas of the Coachella Valley. The city’s economy now relies on tourism, which occurs primarily during the winter months, and casino gambling.

It is a ciy of numerous festivals, conventions, and international events.
The world’s largest rotating aerial tramcars (cable cars) can be found at the Palm Springs Aerial Tramway. These cars ascend two-and-a-half miles up a steep incline to reveal views of the entire Valley. The ascent from the desert floor to an altitude in excess of 8,500 feet (2,600 m) is accompanied by a drop in temperature of 30 degrees Fahrenheit or more, giving riders a cool respite from the heat. A wilderness area can be explored at the top of the tram and there is a restaurant with notable views.

The Palm Springs International Film Festival presents movie star-filled, red-carpet affairs. The Palm Springs Follies stage-show features performers that are over the age of 55. Every Thursday evening downtown Palm Springs is transformed into Village Fest, featuring a diverse display of arts and crafts, a certified farmer’s market, food, and live entertainment on historic Palm Canyon Drive. The Palm Springs Convention Center underwent a multi-million-dollar expansion and remodeling in 2005.

The Palm Springs Art Museum presents traveling art exhibitions plus a variety of entertainment in its Annenberg Theater. The Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians is located downtown with the Spa Resort Hotel and Casino. There are other casinos in the Coachella Valley as well, notably in the cities of Rancho Mirage, Indio, Coachella and Cabazon.

Numerous five star hotels, restaurants and attractions cater to tourists, while shoppers can find high-end boutiques in downtown and uptown Palm Springs. There is a water park and several skateboard parks.

Cathederal City, CA

Cathedral City,CA

Cathedral City is a city in Riverside County, California, United States. The population was 42,647 at the 2000 census. Sandwiched between Palm Springs and Rancho Mirage, it is one of the cities in the Coachella Valley (Palm Springs area) of southern California.

The town’s name derives from “Cathedral Canyon” to the south of the town, so named in 1850 by Colonel Henry Washington because its rock formations were reminiscent of a cathedral. The city itself started as a housing subdivision in 1925, but was not incorporated until 1981. The city grew 4-5 times in two decades, as the 2006 population estimate is 48,000.

Locals gave it the nickname “Cat City”, short for Cathedral. Others like historians claim that came from the reputation as a slinger gaming gulch in the late 19th century, and a safe haven for bars or saloons during prohibition of the 1920s.

Economy
The city’s several local golf resorts and tourism attractions provide a key element of the local economy for Cathedral City. It is the site of Lawrence Welk’s Desert Oasis Hotel/resort located in the Cathedral Canyon Country Club. Other golf courses are the De Anza Palm Springs Country Club and Mobile Home Park, the Outdoor Resorts RV Golf Club Palm Springs, and the Doral Desert Princess Resort and Golf Club.

There is a large automotive mega-dealership known as the Palm Springs Auto Mall based on the city limits with Palm Springs, except the dealership lies in the Cathedral City side of State route 111 and Perez Road.

Rancho Mirage, CA

Rancho Mirage, CA

Rancho Mirage is a resort city in Riverside County, California, United States. The population was 13,249 at the 2000 census, but the seasonal (part-time) population can exceed 20,000. In between Cathedral City and Palm Desert, it is one of the eight cities of the Coachella Valley (Palm Springs area). Rancho Mirage was incorporated in 1973 from a merger of Mirage Cove with five unincorporated areas known as the “Cove communities” (Desert, Magnesia, Palmas, Tamarisk and Thunderbird), but had 3,000 permanent residents at the time.

Although the first modern settlements date back to the 1920s and 1930s, Rancho Mirage got its claim to fame after World War II. The Annenberg Estate or Sunnylands, owned by philanthropists Walter and Leonore Annenberg, had long been popular with the wealthy and powerful, including Frank Sinatra, Bob Hope, Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers, Queen Elizabeth II, and Mary Martin. Several United States Presidents have vacationed at the Annenberg estate, including Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, and Gerald Ford. Ford later bought a house in Rancho Mirage and was living there at the time of his death in 2006. The Betty Ford Center, a world-renowned addiction rehabilitation center, is located in Rancho Mirage at the Eisenhower Medical Center.

Rancho Mirage boasts twelve golf courses, also known as country clubs. The city’s first golf resort was the Thunderbird Guest Ranch, opened in 1946 for entertainers and business clientele. Other golf resorts are the Tamarisk, Mission Hills, the Springs, Sunrise, KSL Resorts’ Rancho Las Palmas hotel (opened in 1979 to replace the Desert Air golf and private airport from 1954-1978), Rancho Mirage, Morningside, Mission Hills North Course, Westin Hotels Mission Hills resort, and Tuscania by Sunrise Company opened in 2006.

The Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians of Palm Springs runs the Agua Caliente Casino on the intersection of Bob Hope Drive and Ramon Road off Interstate 10, opened in 2002. The thriving casino is a popular destination for locals, tourists, and gambling enthusiasts. In 2008 the tribal board completed the expansion of the Agua Caliente resort, which includes a 12-story hotel and spa, as well as remodelling the casino and expanding the parking structures. A state-of-the-art theater for top name entertainers will open in the spring of 2009. Though the Agua Caliente Resort and Casino was just outside the border of Rancho Mirage in an unincorporated area, the City of Rancho Mirage included the property as part of the city in an agreement with the tribe so they would have access to police and firefighting services.

Rancho Mirage has expanded its economy from one relegated to seasonal, resort-based and low-paying, to include more light industry and commerce by I-10 and the Union Pacific Railroad, high-end retail centers like the River shopping complex, opened in 2005 and built around an artificial lake that resembles a castle’s moat.

Indian Wells, Ca.

Indian Wells, CA

Indian Wells is a city in Riverside County, California, in the Coachella Valley (Palm Springs area), in between Palm Desert and La Quinta. As of the 2000 census, the city population was 3,816.

The city hosts the Indian Wells Masters (also known by its current sponsorship name of BNP Paribas Open), one of the nine tournaments in the Masters 1000 of high-level events operated by the Association of Tennis Professionals. The event is held in the 16,100-seat stadium of the Indian Wells Tennis Garden.

Geography and climate
Indian Wells is located at 33°42′57″N 116°20′28″W / 33.71583°N 116.34111°W / 33.71583; -116.34111 (33.715755, -116.341109).[1]
According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 13.4 square miles (34.7 km²), of which, 13.2 square miles (34.3 km²) of it is land and 0.2 square miles (0.4 km²) of it (1.19%) is water.

Indian Wells, located on the western slopes of the Coachella Valley, is sheltered by the San Bernardino Mountains to the north, the Santa Rosa Mountains to the south, by the San Jacinto Mountains to the west and by the Little San Bernardino Mountains to the east.

The surrounding geography gives Indian Wells its hot, dry climate, with 354 days of sunshine and less than 6 inches (150 mm) of rain annually. Winter temperatures average in the 70s with nights in the mid 40s, but the dry desert heat of summer pushes daytime temperatures well above 100, with overnight temperatures in the mid-to-upper 70s.

La Quinta, Ca.

La Quinta, CA

La Quinta is a resort city in Riverside County, California, USA, specifically in the Coachella Valley between Indian Wells and Indio. The population was 23,694 at the 2000 census. The Robb Report credits La Quinta as the nation’s leading golf destination. Among those destinations is the La Quinta Resort and Club, a resort dating to 1926 and famous as the spot in which director Frank Capra penned the screenplay of Lost Horizon. The Tom Fazio-designed golf course at The Quarry at La Quinta is ranked among the top 100 golf courses in the United States. In January 2008, the Arnold Palmer Classic Course at the city’s SilverRock Golf Resort, became one of the four host golf courses for the annual Bob Hope Chrysler Classic PGA golf tournament.

Colonial history
The area of La Quinta was first established in the early 18th century by Spanish conquistadores under the command of Captain Juan Bautista De Anza, as the fifth resting point for travellers along the route from present-day Mexico to the San Gabriel Missions of Los Angeles and present-day Riverside and San Bernardino 60–100 miles away. The words “la quinta” are Spanish, translating to “the fifth”. More specifically, the word “quinta” is known in Mexico as a type of hacienda. Spanish and later Mexican settlement in the “East Valley” (Eastern Coachella Valley) was sparse, most residents were members of the indigenous Cahuilla tribe. The earliest records of any inhabitation of La Quinta and other communities was in 1823, after Mexico declared independence from Spain, prior to California’s annexation by the United States in 1848.

Modern development and incorporation
In the late-19th century and early-20th century (1880–1920), agriculture developed in present-day La Quinta and “East Valley” by pre-modern (mountain water runoff or open water springs) and modern irrigation techniques. At the time, California and federal land surveyors declared the sand dunes uninhabitable, only the hard rock ground of the “Marshall Cove” held potential farming and residential development.

In 1927, Walter Morgan established the La Quinta Resort at the northern section of “Marshall Cove”, as a type of secluded hideaway for nearby Hollywood’s celebrities and socialites. The Resort was the site for the Coachella Valley’s first golf course, coinciding with the construction and pavement of State Route 111 in the 1930s. Further expansion of Washington Street in the 1950s and 1960s connected La Quinta with US Highways 60 and 99 (became Interstate 10 in the 1970s).

As nearby desert cities grew to capacity, La Quinta’s growth rose dramatically by the mid-1990s, which led to its incorporation as a city in Riverside County in 1982. In the 1980 census, La Quinta had 4,200 residents, then increased to 11,215 by 1990 in the city’s early phases of residential area growth. Once predominantly a part-time community until the early-1990s, more full-time residents live in La Quinta to make it possibly more populous than Palm Springs by 2006, according to some demographers

Desert Hot Springs. Ca.

Desert Hot Spring,CA

Desert Hot Springs, also known as DHS, is a city in Riverside County, California, United States. The city is located within the Coachella Valley geographic region, sometimes referred to as the Desert Empire. The population was 25,938 at the 2010 census, up from 16,582 at the 2000 United States Census. The area has undergone rapid development and high population growth since the 1970s, when there were 2,500 to 6,000 resident.

History
In 1913 the first successful homesteader in the area was Cabot Yerxa, who discovered hot water on Miracle Hill. Due to the San Andreas Fault bisecting the area, one side has cold water, the other has hot. His large Pueblo Revival Style architecture structure, hand built over 20 years, is now one of the oldest adobe-style buildings in Riverside County, and houses Cabot's Pueblo Museum, designated a state historical site after his death in 1965. Cabot's Trading Post & Gallery opened in February 2008.

The town was founded by L. W. Coffee on July 12, 1941. The original town site was centered at the intersection of Palm Drive and Pierson Boulevard and was only one square mile. Coffee chose the name Desert Hot Springs because of the area's natural hot springs.
Desert Hot Springs became a tourist destination in the 1950s because of its small spa hotels and boutique hotels. The city's seclusion appealed to urban "escapees."
Realtors arrived to speculate, and thousands of lots and streets were laid out over a six square mile area. Some homes were bought by retirees and the area incorporated as a city in 1963, with 1,000 residents.

Desert Hot Springs experienced periods of significant growth in the 1980s and 1990s, when most of the vacant lots were filled with new houses and duplex apartments. The city's population doubled in the 1980s and increased by 5,000 in the 2000 census.

In 1993, a 3-star hotel, Mirage Springs Hotel Resort opened in DHS. Despite good reviews and providing much needed financial revenue to DHS, Mirage Springs closed its doors in 1998. Another hotel, the Miracle Springs Resort and Spa, has since occupied the site.

Desert Hot Springs High School opened in 1999, two new public parks and several country clubs were proposed.

Rancho Mirage, CA Area Map